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Archive for the ‘Red Rocks’ Category

Sedona Airport Overlook

by: Editor on 8/13/2017

 

Explore one of the most accessible hiking trails in Sedona, ranked as easy to moderate and recently renovated to include guide ropes and steps. Trails are flanked by rocks, and there are a number of conservation areas where hikers can enjoy the natural beauty of the region. At just 60 feet of total ascension, this gentle hike is the perfect way to get acquainted with Sedona and enjoy sweeping desert views.

The initial incline takes hikers towards Airport Lookout Summit Trail. Fences and cables keep the local natural area well protected without disrupting the adventure for hikers. The new trailhead sign to Overlook Point Summit leads hikers directly ahead, or you have the option to head left towards the Coconino Loop Trail. Manmade steps have replaced the rough, slippery trails featured before the 2015 renovation project.

Plan for Dusk or Dawn

The August heat can be intense in Sedona, and hikes are best planned for sunset or sunrise. It’s also the perfect time to enjoy how the colors reflect across the desert landscape. Well-defined steps are featured throughout the trails, and hikers find rock plateaus as the trail increases in incline.

The last trail leg has plenty of cables for balance, and at the peak of Airport Lookout Summit part of the Coconino Loop Trail can be seen. Also look for Courthouse Butte and the famous Bell Rock from this vantage point.

 

Amitabha Stupa and Peace Park

by: Editor on 7/28/2017

 

Open daily from dawn to dusk, the Amitabha Stupa is a stunning destination perched amidst the juniper pines and flanked by one of the most amazing landscapes in the area. It’s long been a space for those of all faiths and spiritual leanings, surrounded by crimson spires and looking especially striking at dawn and dusk. It’s just a short hike along curving trails to the 36-foot tall Amitabha Stupa and its small sister the Tara Stupa.

Many come here for meditation, prayer, gentle yoga and healing practices. Considered a sacred space, there’s no charge to visit but donations are appreciated. Considered one of the oldest pieces of architecture in the world, archaeologist estimate it was constructed during Buddha’s era 2,600 years ago. “Stupas” are usually found in the East, but are occasionally discovered in the West.

A Brief History

Stupas are indicative of the “living presence of Buddha” and are a symbol of an enlightened mind. They’ve been constructed as a means to end famine, war and promote well-being and prosperity. By serving as a benefit to all living beings, they are adopted as a source of healing and wellness.

If you’re with a group of 4+ people, local caretakers are available to offer “The Inside Story of the Amitabha Stupa,” which demonstrates the spiritual prominence of such structures. This is a complimentary option and can be arranged by calling 877-788-7229.

 

Hop on the Red Rock Magic Trolley

by: Editor on 5/22/2017

 

Have you seen the little red trolley cruising around Sedona? That’s the Red Rock Magic Trolley, offering a variety of tour options so you can take in the best sights and hidden gems of the region in one fell swoop. Tours range from 55 – 85 minutes depending on which is selected, and it’s a fantastic quick trip even for locals who haven’t explored every nook and cranny of their gorgeous town.

The trolleys are also available for private rentals, as is renting a fleet of vans. Popular for business conferences, weddings and more, it’s a unique way to get around Sedona. However, day tours are by far the most popular. Guides are always local and know every inch of the city—as well as a few jokes to keep the party going.

Get on Board

Choose from three tour options, and book your reservations online. The Chapel of the Holy Cross Tour showcases the most visited destination in Sedona, just down Highway 179. Tickets are just $15 for adults, and the trolley departs seven days per week at 3 p.m. Choose the Boynton Canyon Tour and see Jordan Park while finding out about Native American history and the western film industry. These tours are $25 for adults.

The Bell Rock Tour’s highlight is the “land of giants” where vortex sites and the most famed rocks are the stars. Tickets are $25 for adults to join this 85-minute tour. You can opt for a Sunsetter Tour, too, and see the rocks in a brand new light!

 

Discover the Verde Valley Wine Trail

by: Editor on 2/22/2017

 

Go where the trail leads! In gorgeous Sedona, the Verde Valley Wine Trail is nearby and attracts wine lovers from around the world. Enjoy local Arizona wines surrounded by the red rock scenery with seven wineries and eight tasting rooms at the ready. Each winery is one of a kind and offers unique wines at every stop. Near Jerome, Clarkdale, Cottonwood, Cornville and of course Sedona, it’s a fun way to see more of the local region.

Cottonwood is the hub of the Wine Trail, nestled above the desert heat yet away from the chill of the high country. Buttes and mountains surround the town, it’s the perfect place to start your wine-fueled journey. So far a largely under-discovered mecca, you’ll quickly fall in love with this gem as you explore the fantastic wine producing areas.

Happy Trails

Sedona features rocky soil that makes the vines struggle, leading to vines that are more energetic and produce higher quality grapes. This means a more intense fruit with higher flavor concentration. In the past decade, wineries and vineyards have really sprung up in the area, and as pioneers, they’re setting the bar high.

Stop by each tasting room for samples. The seven wineries include Oak Creek Vineyards, Javelina Leap Vineyards, Alcantara Vineyards, Clear Creek Winery, Chateau Tumbleweed, D.A. Ranch and Page Springs Cellars. See how wines are crafted, and also discover some of the best hidden bistros in town.

 

Sedona Marathon

by: Editor on 2/1/2017

 

The 12th annual Sedona Marathon takes place February 4th, and if you’re a runner looking for a new challenge with stunning scenery, this is one event you won’t want to miss. Prefer to cheer on the runners, or want a different length for your race? You’ll find 5k, 10k, half marathon and youth events also racing through the red rocks at this spectacular event.

February registration is $120 for the full marathon, and last-minute registrations might be possible. The Sedona Marathon is one of the most breathtaking in the U.S., and the organizers take pride in giving runners and spectators plenty of southern hospitality and a one-of-a-kind experience.

Run On

Whether you’re a regular marathoner or a first-timer, the course is designed to be full of supporters, stunning scenes and plenty of hydration and snack stations. The start and finish line is on Navoti Drive, convenient to major streets and highways. The venue opens at 7 a.m., and the marathon starts at 9, with massage tents available starting at 10.

Stick around for the full marathon awards at 1 p.m. It’s dubbed the best marathon in Arizona, one of the most beautiful races in the country, and a race that “takes runners through some of the world’s most beautiful landscapes.” All participants get swag, bragging rights and a world-class experience.

 

What Makes the Red Rocks Red?

by: Editor on 1/10/2017

 

Arizona, and especially the Sedona area, is world-famous for the “red rocks,” but how did they get that hue? Made of red sandstone formations, they can look like they glow a bright red and orange thanks to the sun’s rays. It’s no surprise that they’re a favorite backdrop for a number of activities from photography and hiking to spiritual retreats and, of course, outdoor weddings and photos.

The city of Sedona also has some unique history. The city was named for Sedona Arabella Miller Schnebly, wife of the city’s first postmaster circa 1910. She was known for her hard work ethic and hospitality. However, her name was made up by her mother simply because “it sounded pretty.”

Rock On

The sandstone red rocks are full of hematite, also known as rust, which stains the stones along Schnebly Hill especially deep. Much of the Sedona rock terrain is very steep because the top layer of the “strata” is made up of limestone and basalt—these materials are harder than the actual sandstone underneath.

When water runs along the edge of the terrain, the lower layers are eaten away to create the stunning cliffs Arizona is famous for. Eventually, big slabs break off and form canyons. Where the slabs have fallen away, you can see the raw material underneath before the process begins all over again.