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Archive for the ‘Day Trips’ Category

Sedona Airport Overlook

by: Editor on 8/13/2017

 

Explore one of the most accessible hiking trails in Sedona, ranked as easy to moderate and recently renovated to include guide ropes and steps. Trails are flanked by rocks, and there are a number of conservation areas where hikers can enjoy the natural beauty of the region. At just 60 feet of total ascension, this gentle hike is the perfect way to get acquainted with Sedona and enjoy sweeping desert views.

The initial incline takes hikers towards Airport Lookout Summit Trail. Fences and cables keep the local natural area well protected without disrupting the adventure for hikers. The new trailhead sign to Overlook Point Summit leads hikers directly ahead, or you have the option to head left towards the Coconino Loop Trail. Manmade steps have replaced the rough, slippery trails featured before the 2015 renovation project.

Plan for Dusk or Dawn

The August heat can be intense in Sedona, and hikes are best planned for sunset or sunrise. It’s also the perfect time to enjoy how the colors reflect across the desert landscape. Well-defined steps are featured throughout the trails, and hikers find rock plateaus as the trail increases in incline.

The last trail leg has plenty of cables for balance, and at the peak of Airport Lookout Summit part of the Coconino Loop Trail can be seen. Also look for Courthouse Butte and the famous Bell Rock from this vantage point.

 

Discover the Verde Valley Wine Trail

by: Editor on 2/22/2017

 

Go where the trail leads! In gorgeous Sedona, the Verde Valley Wine Trail is nearby and attracts wine lovers from around the world. Enjoy local Arizona wines surrounded by the red rock scenery with seven wineries and eight tasting rooms at the ready. Each winery is one of a kind and offers unique wines at every stop. Near Jerome, Clarkdale, Cottonwood, Cornville and of course Sedona, it’s a fun way to see more of the local region.

Cottonwood is the hub of the Wine Trail, nestled above the desert heat yet away from the chill of the high country. Buttes and mountains surround the town, it’s the perfect place to start your wine-fueled journey. So far a largely under-discovered mecca, you’ll quickly fall in love with this gem as you explore the fantastic wine producing areas.

Happy Trails

Sedona features rocky soil that makes the vines struggle, leading to vines that are more energetic and produce higher quality grapes. This means a more intense fruit with higher flavor concentration. In the past decade, wineries and vineyards have really sprung up in the area, and as pioneers, they’re setting the bar high.

Stop by each tasting room for samples. The seven wineries include Oak Creek Vineyards, Javelina Leap Vineyards, Alcantara Vineyards, Clear Creek Winery, Chateau Tumbleweed, D.A. Ranch and Page Springs Cellars. See how wines are crafted, and also discover some of the best hidden bistros in town.

 

Devil’s Bridge Trail

by: Editor on 10/1/2016

 

When a hike has “devil” in the title, you know it’s going to be bad in all the right ways! At the end of a steep trail that must be driven, you’re faced with a terrifying looking butte that hovers over the canyons. Start the drive early, otherwise one of the devilish tricks of the trail is battling the Arizona sun in your eyes the entire time. The trek from the parking area to the tip of the trail can be challenging in the heat, but well worth it.Keep in mind that going “all the way” can be terrifying and a little dangerous for those who aren’t used to demanding hikes. It is likely not the best option for those with kids, pets, or anyone who isn’t confident in their hiking abilities. There are no safety rails at the danger zone! However, there are avid hikers who take dogs and even newborns in slings to the very end.

A Hike to Remember

There’s an easy hike “just” to the bridge that’s very family friendly. If you’re renting a vehicle, opting for four wheel drive is a smart move. The roads are rough and difficult at times, which is why some ATV riders love the area. Keep in mind that the parking lot can fill up by about 10 a.m., so early risers are handsomely rewarded with a quiet, cool experience.

Pack a picnic lunch for the ride back or tough out the break area if you can handle the heat. You’ll be rewarded with views like no other, so don’t forget the camera. Most hikers say it’s well “worth it,” which means you definitely have to work for the end results. Are you up for taking on the devil?

 

Visit Honanki

by: Editor on 8/12/2016

 

The Honanki Heritage Site is located in Red Rock country and, along with the sister site Palatki, are the biggest cliff dwellings in the area and are estimated to have formed circa 1200 AD. The Hopi ancestors, the Sinagua, called Honanki home and used the space to raise families, create tools and leather goods, and prepare meals. In the nearby area, the Sinagua hunted rabbit and deer, which are still found in abundance today. There are a number of nearby edible plants, too.

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Today, the heritage site can be found on the outskirts of Sedona and is governed by the US Forest Service via the Red Rock Pass Program. The site is open daily from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m., closed only on Thanksgiving and Christmas. Here, you’ll find an interpretive site and restroom facilities. A Red Rock Pass or America the Beautiful Pass is required for all vehicles and can be purchased from a number of local retailers.

Rules of the Rocks

Pets are only allowed in the parking lot area. There are hiking trails throughout the area suitable for most ages and abilities. To access the site, head 17 miles northwest of Sedona on Highway 89A via West Sedona. Past mile marker 365, you’ll turn right onto Forest Road 525. Follow 525 for 9.5 miles past the Loy Canyon Cattleguard trailhead.

Many consider Honanki a spiritually rich site, and it’s a favorite for meditative walks. It’s a must for any Sedona visitor and a welcome respite from the bustle of the city.

 

Walks are for the Birds

by: Editor on 7/24/2016

Every Wednesday and Saturday, a complimentary guided walk is offered at the Red Rock State Park’s Center for Environmental Education. Meet on the viewing deck right above the visitor center, and a birding enthusiast will take you on a journey for all birding levels and nearly all ages/abilities. Whether you’ve never gone birding before or you’re a seasoned pro, this is a gorgeous way to get to know some of the feathered locals in the area.

Bring your binoculars and allow the Audubon Society’s designated Important Birding Area (IBA) to showcase some of the many bird species that call Sedona home. All walks are included with the requisite park entrance fee. Come to 4050 Red Rock Loop Road for a unique experience, or call 928-282-6907 for more information.

A Rocky Start

Red Rock State Park is home to the Mars-like red sandstone caverns that offer some of the best photography experiences in the area. Preserving the “riparian habitat” that runs along Oak Creek is the primary mission of the park governors, and offering birding walks is one of the many ways to share the beauty of the red rocks with locals and tourists alike.

If you don’t have binoculars, swing into one of the many outdoor stores in town, because you don’t want to miss this!

 

Red Rock State Park Events

by: Editor on 4/4/2016

Meet fellow bird lovers at 9am every Wednesday and Saturday during the month of April. Located at the Visitor Center of the Arizona Red Rock State Park, a naturalist guide will take you on a walk suitable for birders of all levels. Binoculars are recommended. If you prefer a DIY approach, start from the Hummingbird Patio and don’t forget the Visitor Center’s roof! Most birds can be spotted in the riparian area near Oak Creek. All walks are included with park entrance fees.

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Daily guided nature walks are also available starting at 10am. Meet with a volunteer as you’re taken on a journey throughout the park. Learn about various life zones, wildlife, geology, archaeology, and the history of the park.

Meet Mother Nature

Inside the Visitor Center is a theater, where displays and exhibitions are in constant rotation. Information on the flora and fauna of the area, an interactive Sedona map, and the House of Apache Fire’s computer program information booth is here. “The Natural Wonders of Sedona” narrated by John Conway is featured many times throughout the day.

There are also special events throughout the month but may be posted on short notice. From Native American drumming to meditative walks, check with the State Parks system to see what will spring up in April!